Amazon A/B Tested This Bigger Price Style

Leak #75 from Amazon.com   |   Jan 11, 2022 Product

I managed to capture this exciting little big price styling experiment from Amazon before it wrapped up this week. What looks like a small change actually has a few interesting differences packed into a single variation which you can see below. The experiment ran on multiple product pages and now looks like the variation has been implemented - hinting at an improvement.

(We also have a collection of pricing patterns with actual test data.)

A - Jan 8, 2022 Screenshot
IMPLEMENTED Confirmed Jan 11, 2022
B - Jan 8, 2022 Screenshot

Highlighted UI Changes From This Leak

  1. Price Styling Changes

    Some of the changes and differences in the variation include:

    Larger price totals (the $9.99).

    Removed decimal point on the total price.

    Larger and preceding relative discount (33%).

    Greater color contrast between the relative discount amount (33%) in red and total amount ($9.99).

    Lowered strike through list price under the total.

    Removal of the total saving amount ($5.01).

    Removal of details link. I'm actually not sure where this linked to - possibly a small tool tip.

Did Etsy Just Inspire Amazon To Do This?

Perhaps it's a coincidence, but Etsy also ran a simple price styling experiment just two months ago. The Etsy experiment also ran on product pages and involved red vs black color styling changes, amongst a few other changes. Not exactly the same but also not very different either. :) Just thought to surface this as well.

Comments

  • Ngaire

    Ngaire 1 week ago 00

    They also made the cent value (99) a smaller font size, presumably to put emphasis on the whole dollar value

  • Ivan

    Ivan 1 week ago 10

    I think the main factor that outweighted all other rather questionable changes is that they finally made the price black.

    • Jay

      Jay 1 week ago 00

      Feel like it could be more around the increased fontweight of the discount - highlights scarcity and the "bargain" factor, prompting more people to check-out.