The Latest A/B Tests


These are the amazing companies we work with that are actively sharing quality a/b test results.


MOST RECENT TESTS

Test #325 on Snocks.com by Samuel Hess | Nov 24, 2020 Desktop

Samuel Hess Tested Pattern #45: Benefit Bar In Test #325 On Snocks.com

In this experiment, a set of reassurances and reviews were added in the header of this ecommerce website. Translating from German, these read: "Anti Hole Guarantee", "Free Shipping" and "X Ratings out of Y Reviews".

Test #324 on by Jakub Linowski | Oct 30, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Jakub Linowski Tested Pattern #17: Expensive First In Test #324

This experiment tested the order of purchase plans. The control version sorted the purchase options by the least expensive while the variation sorted them by the most expensive first. Impact on sales and revenue was measured.

Test #323 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Oct 29, 2020 Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #117: Company Logos In Test #323 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, the variation replaced a text testimonial with high-profile production companies that have cast with Backstage. The logos were shown during the signup and checkout flow.

Test #322 on Thomasnet.com by Kyle Phillips | Oct 27, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Kyle Phillips Tested Pattern #82: Onboarding Callouts In Test #322 On Thomasnet.com

This experiment variation prompted users to save (bookmark) a company profile on a company detail page. Clicking on the save feature while logged out, would prompt a registration modal. Hence the save feature acted as an extra reason to signup. The number of people engaging or interacting with the feature was measured, as well as registrations.

Test #321 on Elevate App App by Jesse Germinario | Oct 23, 2020 Mobile

Jesse Germinario Tested Pattern #11: Gradual Reassurance In Test #321

This experiment aimed to increase the number of application ratings from within the Elevate app. Success was measured by the number of users going towards Google Play to create the rating. The control version prompted users if they wanted to rate the app with a simple yes and no answer. The variation however presented the rating choice right away in the form of 5 stars - enabling users to express their choice sooner.

Test #320 on by Jakub Linowski | Oct 20, 2020 Desktop

Jakub Linowski Tested Pattern #49: Above The Fold Call To Action In Test #320

An extra "Place Order" button was duplicated above the fold on this checkout page. The control had a similar button further down at the bottom of the screen. The impact on total sales was measured from this change.

Test #99 on Vivareal.com.br by Rodrigo Maués | Sep 23, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Rodrigo Maués Tested Pattern #24: Visible Availability In Test #99 On Vivareal.com.br

In this experiment, a lead form on a listing page showed whether an agent was recently online or not. The diplayed had two statuses: either indicating that someone is online now, or the most recent time they were online in minutes.

Test #319 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Sep 30, 2020 Desktop

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #113: More Or Fewer Plans In Test #319 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, a 3 plan vs 2 plan pricing page was shown to potential customers. Impact on sales and revenue were measured.

Test #318 on Thomasnet.com by Kyle Phillips | Sep 29, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Kyle Phillips Tested Pattern #60: Repeated Bottom Call To Action In Test #318 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, a simple link to a newsletter signup landing page was added at the bottom of an article. The newsletter landing page then encouraged users to provide their email address for future article updates.

Test #317 on Volders.com by Michal Fiech | Sep 28, 2020 Mobile

Michal Fiech Tested Pattern #119: Unselected Or Selected Defaults In Test #317 On Volders.com

In this mobile experiment, an unselected vs selected payment plan was tested for its impact on sales. The experiment ran on a mid page of a signup funnel where customers were being asked to select one of two payment plans.

Test #316 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro | Sep 24, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #22: Empowering Headline In Test #316 On Trydesignlab.com

In this experiment, the headline was changed to focus more on the end-goal of the UX Academy program - that of landing your first UI/UX role.

Test #315 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Aug 22, 2020 Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #7: Social Counts In Test #315 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, a dynamic number of job postings was displayed during the signup process - reinforcing the value of signing up for membership access.

Test #314 on Zapimoveis.com.br by Vinicius Barros Peixoto | Aug 21, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Vinicius Barros Peixoto Tested Pattern #43: Long Titles In Test #314 On Zapimoveis.com.br

In this experiment, a dynamic page title was generated and added at the top of the screen. The first few words from a property description were used to dynamically generate these titles. The effect on leads was measured.

Test #313 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro | Aug 19, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #11: Gradual Reassurance In Test #313 On Trydesignlab.com

In this experiment, instead of showing a single-focused lead form (for the UX Academy Program), users were asked to express a wider set of choices first (for the UX Academy or shortter set of skill-based courses). The experiment measured overall leads for both types of programs.

Test #312 on by Jakub Linowski | Aug 14, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Jakub Linowski Tested Pattern #83: Progressive Fields In Test #312

In this experiment, we tested a visible "Shipping Frequency" (A) option against a progressively displayed one (B) that would only appear after someone first chose a duration option. Thus in variation B, the buy box component would initially appear with fewer fields and smaller. The experiment measured initial progression and actual sales. 

Note on the data: the experiment was run a little shorter than usual, as one of the variations triggered a stop rule to protect losses (so the effect might be somewhat inflated from a lower power).

Test #311 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Aug 11, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #118: Category Images In Test #311 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, category links (linking to casting call search results) were replaced with tile images. In addition, 2 levels of categories were also replaced with a single text link for each tile. Finally, the font size of the link titles was also increased.

Test #310 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Jul 25, 2020 Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #77: Ghost Buttons In Test #310 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, the style of a button leading to view detailed casting calls on a listing page was changed. In version the style was a filled high contrast blue background, and the the B variation there was a feint "ghost button" style. 

Test #309 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria | Jul 24, 2020 Desktop

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #72: Priming Step In Test #309 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, an extra step was prepended at the beginning of a multiple step signup modal flow. The signup modal would appear on listing pages after requests to contact a listed company. The idea was to prime users with benefits of signing up in order to increase their motivation to do so. The experiment measured the impact on the initial progression (to the step with the email form).

Test #308 on Umbraco.com by Lars Skjold Iversen | Jul 23, 2020 Desktop

Lars Skjold Iversen Tested Pattern #4: Testimonials In Test #308 On Umbraco.com

In this experiment, three testimonials were added mid way though on a CMS landing page. At the end of the customer testimonials an additional trial signup button was also added - which was also the primary metric. 

Test #307 on Volders.de by Michal Fiech | Jul 17, 2020 Desktop

Michal Fiech Tested Pattern #77: Ghost Buttons In Test #307 On Volders.de

This experiment measured a shallow click goal on a button that would encourage to repeated the action that was just completed (in this case a contract cancellation). In the control version (A) a thank-you screen shows a filled button style, and the variant (B) there was a ghost button. As a note, I also flipped the A-B in this experiment for the purpose of matching it to our ghost button pattern, which means that Volders in fact was starting  out with a ghost button to begin with.