The Latest A/B Tests


These are the amazing companies we work with that are actively sharing quality a/b test results.


MOST RECENT TESTS

Test #312 on by Jakub Linowski | Aug 14, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Jakub Linowski Tested Pattern #83: Progressive Fields In Test #312

In this experiment, we tested a visible "Shipping Frequency" (A) option against a progressively displayed one (B) that would only appear after someone first chose a duration option. Thus in variation B, the buy box component would initially appear with fewer fields and smaller. The experiment measured initial progression and actual sales. 

Note on the data: the experiment was run a little shorter than usual, as one of the variations triggered a stop rule to protect losses (so the effect might be somewhat inflated from a lower power).

Test #311 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Aug 11, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #118: Category Images In Test #311 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, category links (linking to casting call search results) were replaced with tile images. In addition, 2 levels of categories were also replaced with a single text link for each tile. Finally, the font size of the link titles was also increased.

Test #310 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Jul 25, 2020 Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #77: Ghost Buttons In Test #310 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, the style of a button leading to view detailed casting calls on a listing page was changed. In version the style was a filled high contrast blue background, and the the B variation there was a feint "ghost button" style. 

Test #309 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria | Jul 24, 2020 Desktop

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #72: Priming Step In Test #309 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, an extra step was prepended at the beginning of a multiple step signup modal flow. The signup modal would appear on listing pages after requests to contact a listed company. The idea was to prime users with benefits of signing up in order to increase their motivation to do so. The experiment measured the impact on the initial progression (to the step with the email form).

Test #308 on Umbraco.com by Lars Skjold Iversen | Jul 23, 2020 Desktop

Lars Skjold Iversen Tested Pattern #4: Testimonials In Test #308 On Umbraco.com

In this experiment, three testimonials were added mid way though on a CMS landing page. At the end of the customer testimonials an additional trial signup button was also added - which was also the primary metric. 

Test #307 on Volders.de by Michal Fiech | Jul 17, 2020 Desktop

Michal Fiech Tested Pattern #77: Ghost Buttons In Test #307 On Volders.de

This experiment measured a shallow click goal on a button that would encourage to repeated the action that was just completed (in this case a contract cancellation). In the control version (A) a thank-you screen shows a filled button style, and the variant (B) there was a ghost button. As a note, I also flipped the A-B in this experiment for the purpose of matching it to our ghost button pattern, which means that Volders in fact was starting  out with a ghost button to begin with. 

Test #306 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Jul 09, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #69: Autodiscounting In Test #306 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, the only change was an added message at the top of the pricing screen, clarifying that there is an active discount on a yearly plan. The discount was already communicated with a strike-through price on the control version as well. The variation simply emphasized this aggressively. 

Test #305 on Volders.de by Michal Fiech | Jun 30, 2020 Mobile Desktop

Michal Fiech Tested Pattern #94: Visible Search In Test #305 On Volders.de

In this experiment, a search input field (to look for companies) along with most popular links (also company names) were displayed on the homepage of a leading contract cancellation service. The control (A) version instead had a button that sent users to a next page where the same selection could be made - only later. The measurable success criteria were the number of paid cancellations - a few steps down the funnel.

Test #61 on by Someone | Jun 26, 2020 Desktop

Someone Tested Pattern #9: Multiple Steps In Test #61

In this experiment, a single screen checkout was turned into a series of smaller steps in variation B. This was achieved by showing fewer fields on the first step, and shifting the remaining ones into a 3 step modal popup. The experiment measured successful transactions (sales).

Test #304 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Jun 29, 2020 Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #97: Bigger Form Fields In Test #304 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, larger "Apply" buttons were shown on a casting detail page. The application funnel would take users through a series of steps leading to a paid membership subscription. The experiment measured initial progression and account signups (email signups).

Test #303 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria | Jun 26, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #14: Exposed Menu Options In Test #303 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment variation, the saved suppliers feature was surfaced in the global navigation.It was already possible to save supplier companies from listing and specific company pages. This experiment aimed to increase the saving functions visibility and possibly increase more leads. 

Test #302 on Volders.de by Michal Fiech | Jun 09, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Michal Fiech Tested Pattern #83: Progressive Fields In Test #302 On Volders.de

In this experiment a long form (A) was replaced with a progressive form interaction (B). Most of the form fields would appear in a grey-disabled style, until the prerequioste fields were first filled out.

Test #301 on Zapimoveis.com.br by Vinicius Barros Peixoto | May 31, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Vinicius Barros Peixoto Tested Pattern #21: What It's Worth In Test #301 On Zapimoveis.com.br

In this experiment, the B variation property prices were framed using higher and crossed out price points from 12 months ago - achieving a relative discount. A tooltop was also shown which explained the higher price point on howver. The example in the screenshot translates to "2% less compared to 12 months ago". This high-power experiment measured the number of leads that were generated on property (product) screens.

Test #300 on Volders.de by Michal Fiech | May 25, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Michal Fiech Tested Pattern #3: Fewer Form Fields In Test #300 On Volders.de

In this experiment, a password field was removed on a contract cancellation form (Volders).

In the control version, users were required to enter their email address and a password. If the email address was associated with an existing account, then the password was used to authenticate the user (and validated). When users entered a new email address, then the password field was used to create a new account. 

In the variation, the password field was removed, as the authentication happened after the conversion itself using other backend mechanisms.

 

Test #299 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | May 22, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #60: Repeated Bottom Call To Action In Test #299 On Backstage.com

In this experiment, at the bottom of a search results screen, a membership join button was added along with 3 encouraging reasons. The experiment measured membership funnel starts, as well as paid membership transactions (sales).

Test #298 on Zapimoveis.com.br by Vinicius Barros Peixoto | May 14, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Vinicius Barros Peixoto Tested Pattern #36: More Results In Test #298 On Zapimoveis.com.br

In this experiment on a listing page, the search was expanded to show more listings (variation B). Conditionally, if there were fewer than 36 results, set basic filters such as number bedrooms and bathrooms were expanded and appended to the results. Hence if someone chose 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms in variation A, they would only see listing with that filter. In variation B however they would first see the filtered results, and later they would also see results with 3 or more of each. 

Test #297 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro | May 04, 2020 Desktop

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #41: Sticky Call To Action In Test #297 On Trydesignlab.com

In this experiment, a sticky "Enroll" button was shown on a course landing page. The button lead to a payment funnel to allow enrolling/paying for a course. The exeperiment measured inital progression into this funnel as well as the deeper completed sales metric.

Test #296 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo | Apr 30, 2020 Mobile

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #23: Inline Link Nudge In Test #296 On Backstage.com

In this simple experiment, a text link to a join page was injected on an article page. The hypothesis was that more users would signup as a result of this subtle trigger.

Test #295 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria | Apr 29, 2020 Desktop Mobile

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #25: Nagging Results In Test #295 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, blog article pages were hidden behind a registration wall - requing a signup to access. The registration wall would appear after the first paragraph using gradual opacity to cover the rest of the article. We have published the effects of this change on registrations (signups) and on engagement (users viewing other more important company detail pages).

Test #294 on Umbraco.com by Lars Skjold Iversen | Apr 23, 2020 Desktop

Lars Skjold Iversen Tested Pattern #115: Pricing Comparison Table In Test #294 On Umbraco.com

In this experiment, plan properties on a pricing page were horizontally aligned (for easier comparison). More so, labels and values were also broken on separate lines.