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Test #350 on Expertinstitute.com by Ardit Veliu   Apr 29, 2021 Desktop Content

Ardit Veliu Tested Pattern #16: Welcome Mat - Partial In Test #350 On Expertinstitute.com

In this experiment, a lead generating section with a call to action (welcome mat) was appended at the top of article pages. Impact on lead generation was measured.

Test #330 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo   Dec 29, 2020 Desktop Content

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #116: Links Or Buttons In Test #330 On Backstage.com

In this simple experiment on a content page, links were turned into more prominent buttons. The experiment measured clicks and signups.

Test #326 on Thomasnet.com by Kyle Phillips   Nov 25, 2020 Desktop Mobile Content

Kyle Phillips Tested Pattern #41: Sticky Call To Action In Test #326 On Thomasnet.com

In this simple experiment on an article page, the variation slid out a sticky call to action linking to the next article. The sliding interaction triggered after some scrolling threshold (around 1000px or so). Afterwards, the sticky call to action maintained its floating position. The experiment measured clicks on this "next article" button.

Test #318 on Thomasnet.com by Kyle Phillips   Sep 29, 2020 Desktop Mobile Content

Kyle Phillips Tested Pattern #60: Repeated Bottom Call To Action In Test #318 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, a simple link to a newsletter signup landing page was added at the bottom of an article. The newsletter landing page then encouraged users to provide their email address for future article updates.

Test #296 on Backstage.com by Stanley Zuo   Apr 30, 2020 Mobile Content

Stanley Zuo Tested Pattern #23: Inline Link Nudge In Test #296 On Backstage.com

In this simple experiment, a text link to a join page was injected on an article page. The hypothesis was that more users would signup as a result of this subtle trigger.

Test #295 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria   Apr 29, 2020 Desktop Mobile Content

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #25: Nagging Results In Test #295 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, blog article pages were hidden behind a registration wall - requing a signup to access. The registration wall would appear after the first paragraph using gradual opacity to cover the rest of the article. We have published the effects of this change on registrations (signups) and on engagement (users viewing other more important company detail pages).

Test #252 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria   Jul 30, 2019 Desktop Mobile Content

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #107: Contrast Links & Buttons In Test #252 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment a light blue bold link was tested against a darker blue bold link. 

Test #251 on Goodui.org by Jakub Linowski   Jul 25, 2019 Desktop Mobile Content

Jakub Linowski Tested Pattern #57: Maybe Later In Test #251 On Goodui.org

In this experiment, we tested a standard modal (with 2 choices) against a "Maybe Later" one (with 3 choices). One of the choices in the variant allowed users to postpone their decision with a "maybe" which would enable a floating bar at the bottom of the screen. Clicking on any of the "Yes" options would send people to the bottom of the screen with an email signup form. Increasing signup was our primary measure. Both modals also appeared instantly after a page load.

Test #247 on Thomasnet.com by Julian Gaviria   Jun 13, 2019 Desktop Mobile Content

Julian Gaviria Tested Pattern #41: Sticky Call To Action In Test #247 On Thomasnet.com

In this experiment, the same message (with a link) for signing up to a newsletter was shown in two distinct ways. The control (A) showed the signup message as inline one that preceded the content of the article at the very top. The variant showed the same signup message as a scroll-delayed sticky interaction at the bottom of the screen. The background color of the B variant was also inverted to match the style of the footer.