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MOST RECENT TESTS

Test #176 on Kenhub.com by Niels Hapke   May 16, 2018 Desktop Mobile Checkout

Niels Hapke Tested Pattern #4: Testimonials In Test #176 On Kenhub.com

In this experiment, testimonials were added on a checkout screen.

Test #145 on Normanrecords.com by Nathon Raine   Jan 18, 2018 Desktop Checkout

Nathon Raine Tested Pattern #1: Remove Coupon Fields In Test #145 On Normanrecords.com

In this test the coupon field was replaced with a small link that would bring the field back if needed. This is a more suble approach than just completely removing the coupon field. It still allows for the use of coupon fields by those customers which are truly searching for a way to enter their aquired codes.

Test #137 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro   Dec 22, 2017 Desktop Mobile Checkout

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #46: Pay Later In Test #137 On Trydesignlab.com

This test was run on a 3 step checkout process. The first screen was asking for contact information, and the second screen asked for credit card details. The change was shown on both first two steps as shown on the image below.

Test #138 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro   Dec 22, 2017 Desktop Mobile Checkout

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #42: Countdown Timer In Test #138 On Trydesignlab.com

This test was run on a 3 step checkout process. The first screen was asking for contact information, and the second screen asked for credit card details. The change was shown on both first two steps as shown on the image below.

Test #129 on Barackobama.com by Kyle Rush   Jun 01, 2012 Desktop Checkout

Kyle Rush Tested Pattern #9: Multiple Steps In Test #129 On Barackobama.com

Kyle's team changed a donation form for the Barack Obama 2012 campaign from a single step to a 4 step one. The 4 steps were: amount, personal information, billing information and occupation/employer.

"Our plan was to separate the field groups into four smaller steps so that users did not feel overwhelmed by the length of the form." - Kyle Rush