The Latest A/B Tests


These are the amazing companies we work with that are actively sharing quality a/b test results.


MOST RECENT TESTS

Test #141 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro | Jan 05, 2018 Desktop Mobile

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #49: Above The Fold Call To Action In Test #141 On Trydesignlab.com

The variation introduced a call to action at the top of the screen that linked to a form deep down on a long course page.

Test #140 on Akademiafotografii.p... by Grzegorz Jancewicz | Jan 05, 2018 Desktop Mobile

Grzegorz Jancewicz Tested Pattern #46: Pay Later In Test #140 On Akademiafotografii.p...

The test was run on multiple course pages. The screenshot contains the cropped bottom part of a long screen with an exposed signup form. The variation introduced additional text above the form which states: "Free Cancellation. Payment is not required today".

Test #139 on Examine.com by Martin Wong | Jan 04, 2018 Desktop

Martin Wong Tested Pattern #51: Shortcut Buttons In Test #139 On Examine.com

In this test an additional "Purchase" button was shown along side a "Learn More" button. The "Purchase" button went straight to checkout, whereas the "Learn More" button went to a product overview page.

Test #106 on Examine.com by Martin Wong | May 23, 2017 Desktop

Martin Wong Tested Pattern #15: Bulleted Reassurances In Test #106 On Examine.com

Three reassurances were added underneath each purchase button: Lifetime Updates, Works On All Devices and Money-Back Guarantee.

Test #54 on by Chris Goward | Aug 11, 2016

Chris Goward Tested Pattern #7: Social Counts In Test #54

Client background (e.g. industry, business model):

This client is a healthcare company: their website is designed for lead generation. This company collects leads for their kidney-focused programs and ultimately provides kidney dialysis for those who decide to become patients.

 

Experiment background:

This experiment was focused on a right rail and the goal was to encourage more users to sign up to download the client’s free diabetes-friendly cookbook.

Test #138 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro | Dec 22, 2017 Desktop Mobile

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #42: Countdown Timer In Test #138 On Trydesignlab.com

This test was run on a 3 step checkout process. The first screen was asking for contact information, and the second screen asked for credit card details. The change was shown on both first two steps as shown on the image below.

Test #137 on Trydesignlab.com by Daniel Shapiro | Dec 22, 2017 Desktop Mobile

Daniel Shapiro Tested Pattern #46: Pay Later In Test #137 On Trydesignlab.com

This test was run on a 3 step checkout process. The first screen was asking for contact information, and the second screen asked for credit card details. The change was shown on both first two steps as shown on the image below.

Test #55 on Autodesk.com by | Aug 11, 2016

Tested Pattern #14: Exposed Menu Options In Test #55 On Autodesk.com

In this test, some of the menu options (accessible in the top right hamburger menu) were copied over onto the top navigation. The options that were exposed were "All Products", "Free Trial" and "Buy".

Test #136 on Missetam.nl by Marlies Wilms Floet | Dec 18, 2017 Desktop

Marlies Wilms Floet Tested Pattern #42: Countdown Timer In Test #136 On Missetam.nl

De Nieuwe Zaak (a Dutch ecommerce agency) tested a countdown timer on an ecommerce site. The variation showed how many hours and minutes were left in order to be eligible for next day delivery. The variation beat the control which did not have this element of urgency.

Test #134 on Kenhub.com by Niels Hapke | Dec 14, 2017 Desktop

Niels Hapke Tested Pattern #41: Sticky Call To Action In Test #134 On Kenhub.com

In this beautiful test, the key change was the introduction of a larger call to action linking to a premium / upgrade screen. The call to action was placed on the left sidebar which was floating. This is a great example of providing visibility to important elements by making them persistent.

Test #133 on Bing.com by Ronny Kohavi | Dec 13, 2017 Desktop Mobile

Ronny Kohavi Tested Pattern #43: Long Titles In Test #133 On Bing.com

In 2012 a Microsoft employee working on Bing had an idea about changing the way the search engine displayed ad headlines. Developing it wouldn’t require much effort—just a few days of an engineer’s time—but it was one of hundreds of ideas proposed, and the program managers deemed it a low priority. So it languished for more than six months, until an engineer, who saw that the cost of writing the code for it would be small, launched a simple online controlled experiment—an A/B test—to assess its impact. Within hours the new headline variation was producing abnormally high revenue, triggering a “too good to be true” alert.

HBR, September–October 2017 Issue, https://hbr.org/2017/09/the-surprising-power-of-online-experiments

Note: This experiment was a solid success and replicated multiple times over a period of months. It worked at Bing and had a profound influence. The only reason why we atributed a 0.25 point (a "Maybe") was because we don't have the exact sample size and conversion data.